i. ii. iii. iv. v. music personal
clarissa, looking for a way out

 —  forth

9 . 11

9 . 4

9 . 4 

9 . 4

It had seemed like the beginning of happiness, and Clarissa is still sometimes shocked, more than thirty years later to realize that it was happiness; that the entire experience lay in a kiss and a walk. The anticipation of dinner and a book. The dinner is by now forgotten; Lessing has been long overshadowed by other writers. What lives undimmed in Clarissa’s mind more than three decades later is a kiss at dusk on a patch of dead grass, and a walk around a pond as mosquitoes droned in the darkening air. There is still that singular perfection, and its perfect in part because it seemed, at the time, so clearly to promise more. Now she knows: That was the moment, right then. There has been no other.

—  Michael Cunningham (via observando)

9 . 4

9 . 4 

8 . 12

8 . 10

i’m afraid of a lot of things,

but i’m most afraid of being alone
because i don’t know how far my thoughts will take me

8 . 10

8 . 7

8 . 7 

I think most people are just trying to be happy, and that most of their actions, however misguided, are in line with that goal. Most people just want to feel they belong somewhere, want to be loved, and want to feel they’re important to someone. If you really examine all the wrongheaded and messed-up things they do, they can most often be traced back to that basic desire. The abusers, the addicted, the cruel and unpleasant, the manipulators —these are just people who started this quest for happiness in the basement of their lives. Someone communicated to them through word or deed that they were undeserving, so they think they have to claw their way there over the backs of others, leaving scars and creating damage. Of course, they only create more misery for themselves and others.

—  Lisa Unger, Sliver of Truth (via observando)

8 . 6

8 . 3

8 . 3

8 . 3